How Life Might Look Outside the EU
T he speeches for and against are continuing, on the remain side the Chancellor of the Exchequer released a dossier detailing the case for remaining in the EU. In short its said that it will cost every household £4300. Then on Tuesday it was Michael Gove’s turn to put the case for leaving to the nation. Of the two it was Mr Gove who won out on the day.

“Is the case to remain is based upon fear mongering?  Is the argument to leave is based on supposition of a free trade agreement with an EU without Britain would be possible?”

At this stage we are inclined to agree that the case to remain is largely founded on a premise that we are worse off if we leave.  If that were the case, why ever offer a referendum in the first place given the fact that you know that it is intrinsically wrong to leave? Is it because the clamour to leave within the Conservatives is driving a wedge straight down the middle of the party which could no longer be held together, or is there a something of a double game play going on?

The options to stay look so bleak that in order to quell market fears of what might be viewed as a failed state in principle, is it better to strategically withdraw, whilst protesting to leave is a disaster? Are our leaders trusting the electorate to see common sense and vote to leave regardless of what the government of the day espouse?

Is the case to remain is based upon fear mongering?  Is the argument to leave is based on supposition of a free trade agreement with an EU without Britain would be possible? 

Are Southern EU growth forecasts are flatlining? Is the migrant crisis is an issue that 27 nations of the EU will struggle to deal with as a whole owing to the bureaucratic minefield to get things done quickly?

Its of great concern that the increased security issues caused by ISIS will be difficult to contain in a region with free movement. Is uncontrolled migration within the EU the main concern to the population of UK? Will this expansion cause the infrastructure to collapse?  Is it right to assume that the era post EU would seem more of an attractive proposition when presented with the arguments such as they might seem?

Are young EU nationals flocking here because opportunities at home are few and far between? Are some reasons being the regulatory systems are not as entrepreneur friendly; the startup environment is not as exciting and vibrant because of the lack of diversity in opportunities? Why is youth unemployment in Southern Europe around 50%?

Where is the growth? Who are our competitors? What do we have to offer that can enhance our prospects? Growth is set to come from the Americas Asia and Africa: are our competitors not just in the EU but a in a small town or village in Brazil, Russia, India, China and Africa?

The Commonwealth of Nations comprises of 53 member states of which the majority were mostly territories of the former British Empire. The London declaration of 1949 established that the member nations were free and equal.  Its Head is Queen Elizabeth II as well as being the monarch of 16 of the Commonwealth nations.

The member states have no legal obligation to one another, they're united by language culture, history and shared values of democracy, human rights and the rule of law.

The Commonwealth covers more than 29,958,050 km2 (11,566,870 sq mi), almost a quarter of the world's land area, and spans all six inhabited continents. With an estimated population of 2.328 billion, nearly a third of the world population,[9] the Commonwealth in 2014 produced a nominal gross domestic product (GDP) of $10.45 trillion, representing 17% of the gross world product when measured in purchasing power parity (PPP) and 14% of the gross world product when measured nominally.

Isn't it logical to assume that there are greater opportunities to be had with a free trade agreement with the Commonwealth of Nations? Are there greater opportunities to be had with the cultural, historical, familial connections built up over the last 150 years and through the sizeable diaspora’s of the former colonies who rightly identify themselves as British of a,b,or c heritage?

The discussion will rage on about which model is Britain to run by the Norwegian model, the Canadian model, or the Russian model. ###b/b###  

Couldn't any model be British and tailored to suit the unique position Britain has as a member of the EU? Should we not be hindered by bureaucrats that have failed to provide adequate opportunities for young people in the southern EU?

The week has ended with the visit of President Obama and his intervention on what some would say is an internal matter; but is it really?

Being a global player, being a hub of trade, finance, and innovation, the impact will have a global concern so isn't Mr Obama’s point have resonance? 

“To go it alone is not possible even for a nation as beautiful as Britain”

Barack Obama

“The language of business is English, the opportunities of expansion outside the EU are still possible within the EU”.

The information from the treasury and £4300 loss of income per household by 2030 its argued is conjecture; just as is any projection of prosperity outside the EU.  There is no doubt that there will be a period of instability if the UK votes for a Brexit; but is it not parochial to assume that there are opportunities outside a system when growth projections point to opportunities being greater beyond the immediate borders of the UK/EU?

The language of business is English, the opportunities of expansion outside the EU are still possible within the EU. The real issue is whether the UK is more effective alone or as a supranational group of nations, some of which are in financial turmoil, caused by the alleged ineffectiveness of Brussels, the Eurozone, and whether it inspires the confidence of UK voters or not.

President Obama later said that it would take 5 to 10 years before any deal with Britain could be achieved. We have traded with the USA since its formation and long may it continue, but we should ask the question, aside from the fact that they are our closest ally, we still took 60 years to pay our debt for the food, materials and armaments that were shipped over during World War II. It is noteworthy to point out that the Lend Lease debt hamstrung Britain somewhat when on the continent more funds were sent to rebuild Japan & Germany. 

“The real decision is whether Britain can go it alone or not…It’s not the first time Its had to stand up and be counted. Britain has been in the EU for just over 40 years. It existed for millennia before the EU and did ok”.

Could Britain not maintain the status quo until we can agree terms? If we vote for a Brexit it does not mean that we leave the EU straight away, we will remain full members until a stable transition occurs.  Does that make for a more sensible approach to any transition? Being a global economy is it not in the interest of all concerned that a stable transition occurs?

We are a business and lifestyle platform that promotes SMEs start ups and entrepreneurs that operate in and around London.  It’s a question that should not be answered lightly, nor should it be used as a tool to brow beat or scare the electorate into a decision. Is it an emotional decision, is it a business decision, is it a lifestyle decision, Is it a personal decision based on the facts? 

The facts are as unclear this week as they were at the beginning of last week.

The real decision is whether Britain can go it alone or not…It’s not the first time this nation has had to stand up and be counted. Britain has been in the EU for just over 40 years. It existed for millennia before the EU and did ok.

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